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by Archaeology Newsroom

The first industrial installations in central Macedonia (19th-20th century)

In the second half of the 19th century, while the South of England, Ruhr in Germany and Creusot in France were dynamically entering the third phase of the Industrial Revolution, prerequisites for an industrial development were being created in Central Macedonia. The industrial development in this area from 1850 to 1912 was not accidental. In the urban Centres of Macedonia there already existed a long tradition of yarn-spinning and weaving distributed in small units whose origins went back to the 19th and 18th century. The use of mechanical media for the increase of production created the necessity for much and inexpensive energy. The natural waterfalls of the towns Naoussa, Veroia and Edessa opened possibilities for the exploitation of this power. From 1850 on the penetration of foreign capital into the Ottoman Empire starts. A series of banks open in Thessaloniki.

The evolution of industrial buildings.

Industrial structures are the final product of a complex evolutionary process, built at a low cost with functionality asa priority. The size and the use of repeated constructional and stylistic elements are typical features that distinguish them from other buildings.

The effect on the area.

The Industrial Revolution in the area of Macedonia has to be considered as the primary factor for the creation and development of a new social model. The motionless paternalistic societies of the Balkans start to be transformed. The new ideas already circulating in Europe penetrate the area. The awakening of the social consciousness of the working classes takes place mainly in the major Macedonian area. Thus, in 1905 the weavers of Macedonia go on strike. A superficial development after 1924 that is also accompanied by the renewal of factory machinery ends in 1932. The world economic crisis, the Second World War and the Greek Civil War give the final blow to the industry of the area. Thus, the industrial spring in the area of Central Macedonia that started in the 19th century and expanded into the early 20th century never reached its climax.