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by Archaeology Newsroom

The Roman period

The cultural impact that Greece had on Rome affected European civilization for centuries to come. Rome was embellished with spoils of war from Greece, the famous Pax Romana imposed by Augustus soon after his victory over Anthony in 31 BC contributed to the flourishing of the arts in Greece. Roman philhellenes, the emperor Adrian among others were responsible for many great works. There was a Greek revival in the 1st century AD, with Epictetus the stoic philosopher founding a new school in Nikopolis, Plutarch writes his celebrated work Vitae Parallelae in praise of great men, and Pausanias writes his Description of Greece that can even today be used as a guide. In 330AD, after a long upheaval in the domestic affairs of the Roman empire, Constantine the great inaugurated Constantinople as the new capital of the Empire, thus putting an end to the history of the ancient world.