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by Archaeology Newsroom

The Temple at Anemospilia

With the exception of the almost contemporary discovery of the tomb of Philip at Vergina, no other archaeological find has recently incited the spirits in Greece so much as that of the excavation at Anemospilia in 1979. After the first presentation in Athens and New York in February 1980 a public discussion on the archaeological report was organized, which was of great interest for the mass media. The strong effect the unprecedented and unparallel in many aspects find from Archanes had on scholars and the public was only natural: the excavation produced a number of skeletons belonging to humans who had been crushed as the result of an earthquake, at the very moment that they were to sacrifice a young man so that such an earthquake to be averted. As the History of Science teaches a long time is needed for each great new find to be assimilated. This also applies to the case of Archanes as, since then, finds of more human sacrifices have been discovered in other sites too.