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by Archaeology Newsroom

Two dovecotes in ancient Mantineia

1978 was the year when the author of this article started to make a record of dovecotes around Tripolis. Such dovecotes were to be found “planted” on land in Mantineia and Tegea. The author discovered a towershaped, stonebuilt dovecote not far from the ancient theatre of Mantineia. Marble, architectural members had been incorporated into the walls of the building on both sides, these members probably had come from the temple of Poseidon, nearby. About 100 metres away the author found another simple, two-storey building, a dovecote and house in one. The basement was built of stone with an ancient architectural member wedged into the wall. On the brick first floor there were holes in the wall for pigeons to roost. Both buildings are simple, peasant buildings built without a plan. They seem to date from some time between 1920 and 1940.