AGENDA June 2022

More
S
M
T
W
T
F
S
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
World’s first Parliament building renovated

World’s first Parliament building renovated

The Lycian building that served as the world’s first Parliament building in the ancient city of Patara has been restored, costing 7.5 million Turkish Liras.
Ancient graffiti records the tweets of the past

Ancient graffiti records the tweets of the past

An international project is gaining invaluable insights into the history of ancient Israel through the collection and analysis of inscriptions — pieces of common writing that include anything from a single word to a love poem, epitaph, declaration, or question about faith and everything in between that does not appear in a book or on a coin.
Why It Took So Long to Invent the Wheel

Why It Took So Long to Invent the Wheel

The tricky thing about the wheel is not conceiving of a cylinder rolling on its edge. It's figuring out how to connect a stable, stationary platform to that cylinder
Palmyra: Syria’s ancient desert city besieged

Palmyra: Syria’s ancient desert city besieged

Palmyra is surrounded by the army from all fronts: the Arab citadel, the olive and palm tree groves, the desert, the city," one resident told AFP by telephone, adding that the operation began on February 4.
44 arrested for antiquities trafficking

44 arrested for antiquities trafficking

Greek police arrested a total of 44 people for illegal antiquities trafficking after they investigated the group's moves for months.
Turkey wants Bowling Green State University’s ancient Roman mosaics returned

Turkey wants Bowling Green State University’s ancient Roman mosaics returned

Turkish archeologist Kutalmis Gorkay prepared a report “indicating that these mosaics absolutely belong to the ancient city of Zeugma,” where he now heads excavations. The letter also said that a copy of Gorkay’s report had been sent to the university, in Northwest Ohio near Toledo.
“Mother Earth is the best protector of our antiquities”

“Mother Earth is the best protector of our antiquities”

Lack of funding in crisis-hit Greece has stymied archaeological research and leads experts to rebury valuable discoveries to better protect them, according to Greek daily newspaper Ta Nea.
Tools May Have Been First Money

Tools May Have Been First Money

Hand axes, small handheld stone tools used by ancient humans, could have served as the first commodity in the human world thanks to their durability and utility.
Marmara’s sunken ships set sail to US

Marmara’s sunken ships set sail to US

The excavations carried out as part of the Marmaray and subway projects in Istanbul, have brought a number of sunken ships to light. The world’s largest sunken ships collection is drawing significant interest in scientific circles.
Kairuku, the giant penguin

Kairuku, the giant penguin

Kairuku was 30cm taller and 50% heavier than emperor penguin, the largest of the modern era
Exploration of Biblical battle site reaches new depth

Exploration of Biblical battle site reaches new depth

This summer, Tel Aviv University's Sonia and Marco Nadler Institute of Archaeology is adding another excavation to their already expansive list of seven active digs, in Azekah.
Controversy over price-tagging of artifacts continues

Controversy over price-tagging of artifacts continues

Controversy continues to surround the decision of the Ministry of Culture and Tourism to pass a number of statutory amendments relating to the holding of artifacts by museums.
Germans Loot Nigerian Artefacts

Germans Loot Nigerian Artefacts

While the federal government is locked in a losing war with oil thieves, a professional group has raised the alarm about “artefact thieves” who are quietly plundering national monuments valued at millions of dollars yearly.
Mexicans find millennium-old game board

Mexicans find millennium-old game board

Archaeologists carrying out restoration at a site in the southeastern state of Campeche discovered a Mayan game board dating from more than 1,000 years ago
Paphos archaeological sites to be upgraded

Paphos archaeological sites to be upgraded

The Antiquities Department has agreed to upgrade popular archaeological sites in Paphos, according to the regional board of tourism.
Figure of “the horny little man”

Figure of “the horny little man”

The outline of a figure scratched into a cave in Lapa do Santo in central-eastern Brazil is believed to be between 10,000 and 12,000 years and has been dubbed "the horny little man" because of its oversized phallus.
The two colossi of Memnon are now three!

The two colossi of Memnon are now three!

The two Colossi of Memnon that stand at the entrance to the ruined mortuary temple of Amenhotep III now have a brother.
Student takes award for revealing submerged city’s secrets

Student takes award for revealing submerged city’s secrets

PhD student Ariell Friedman was awarded top prize in Canon Australia's inaugural Extreme Imaging competition for students making advances in imaging science
Ruins of Aztec School Exhibited in Mexican Capital

Ruins of Aztec School Exhibited in Mexican Capital

The ruins of a school in the sprawling pre-Columbian city of Tenochtitlan where children of Aztec nobility received military and religious training are on display here at the Cultural Center of Spain
Czech archaeologists discover long-lost temple in Sudan

Czech archaeologists discover long-lost temple in Sudan

Czech archaeologists have found a long lost temple from the Meroe period near the town of Vad Bon Naga in Sudan.
New finds at Kissonerga-Skalia

New finds at Kissonerga-Skalia

The Ministry of Communications and Works, Department of Antiquities announces the completion of the latest season of excavation at the Early–Middle Bronze Age settlement of Kissonerga-Skalia.
Temple of Mithras comes home

Temple of Mithras comes home

Construction work forces return of remains of Roman temple to the god Mithras to original London home after 58 years
Rare tomb of woman found in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings

Rare tomb of woman found in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings

The only tomb of a woman not related to the ancient Egyptian royal families ever found in the Valley of the Kings
Using Modern Tools to Reconstruct Ancient Life

Using Modern Tools to Reconstruct Ancient Life

To the naked eye, the white, powdery substance appeared to be plaster. That's what the professional and volunteer archaeologists at a dig in Israel concluded.
1 2 378 379 380 384 385