AGENDA December 2022

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Survey at Kalavasos-Laroumena and Arkhangelos

Survey at Kalavasos-Laroumena and Arkhangelos

In July 2022 the “Kalavasos-Laroumena and Arkhangelos Archaeological Research Project” (K-LAARP) conducted surface survey at the above localities at Kalavasos under the direction of Dr. Mara Horowitz.
The Birth and Development of the Idealized Concept of Arcadia in the Ancient World

The Birth and Development of the Idealized Concept of Arcadia in the Ancient World

"In this book the Arcadian dream is followed through the Hellenistic period until its adoption by Rome" (Antonio Corso)
Fossil overturns knowledge about the origin of modern birds

Fossil overturns knowledge about the origin of modern birds

Fossilised fragments of a skeleton have helped upend one of the longest-standing assumptions about the origins of modern birds.
Lost Medieval Chapel Sheds Light on Royal Burials at Westminster Abbey

Lost Medieval Chapel Sheds Light on Royal Burials at Westminster Abbey

New data demonstrates how a section of the building was once the focus for the royal family’s devotion to the cult of a disemboweled saint.
Document signed by Charles Darwin up for auction

Document signed by Charles Darwin up for auction

The item is likely to fetch more than a million pounds, a record price for a Darwin manuscript.
Gold from Troy, Poliochni and Ur all had same origin

Gold from Troy, Poliochni and Ur all had same origin

The gold in objects from Troy, Poliochni and Ur in Mesopotamia have the same geographic origin and were traded over great distances.
Findings from Uluburun shipwreck reveal complex trade network

Findings from Uluburun shipwreck reveal complex trade network

Small communities of highland pastoralists living in present-day Uzbekistan produced and supplied one-third of the tin found aboard the ship.
DNA from medieval Germany tells the origin story of Ashkenazi Jews

DNA from medieval Germany tells the origin story of Ashkenazi Jews

Research team analyzed genome-wide data for 33 Jewish individuals from 14th century Erfurt, Germany.
Athens and Attica in the Early Iron Age and the Archaic Period

Athens and Attica in the Early Iron Age and the Archaic Period

This conference is devoted to the archaeology of Early Iron Age and Archaic period in Athens and Attica, focusing on the publication of the latest discoveries.
New important finds at ancient Antissa

New important finds at ancient Antissa

The excavation by the Ephorate of Antiquities of Lesbos continues since 2017 on the Ovriokastron peninsula.
Early Career Fellowships in Hellenic Studies in Greece and Cyprus

Early Career Fellowships in Hellenic Studies in Greece and Cyprus

Harvard University's Center for Hellenic Studies offers up to five fellowships in Hellenic Studies to early-career postdoctoral researchers based in Greece or Cyprus.
A Companion to North Africa in Antiquity

A Companion to North Africa in Antiquity

A comprehensive introduction to all aspects of North Africa's rich history from the Protohistoric period through Late Antiquity.
Looters caught in an ancient well near Rahat

Looters caught in an ancient well near Rahat

The antiquity looters were digging for treasure in the well, following a southern Bedouin myth.
PhD Programme at Johns Hopkins University

PhD Programme at Johns Hopkins University

The Doctoral Study in Classics at Johns Hopkins University is currently accepting applications for Fall 2023 admission.
Beni Hassan VII. The Burial Apartment of Baqet II

Beni Hassan VII. The Burial Apartment of Baqet II

The present volume provides a detailed description of the tomb’s architectural features and wall scenes, as well as a translation of all of its inscriptions.
Charcoal and Cattle Correlate with Madagascar’s Megafaunal Extinctions

Charcoal and Cattle Correlate with Madagascar’s Megafaunal Extinctions

A new study suggests that changes in land use within the last millennia drove the extinction of Madagascar’s giant animals.
Discovery of interior wonders reveal Rutland villa owners’ lavish lifestyle

Discovery of interior wonders reveal Rutland villa owners’ lavish lifestyle

Archaeologists have returned to the Rutland Roman villa site unearthing further mosaics and fragments of décor that suggest the owners took inspiration from the wider Roman Empire for their interior lifestyles.
New social and educational actions of the Acropolis Museum

New social and educational actions of the Acropolis Museum

The Museum extends its activities to special groups of the public; to groups of refugees and immigrants, to begin with, and to second chance schools in prisons.
Emergency Red List of Cultural Objects at Risk – Ukraine

Emergency Red List of Cultural Objects at Risk – Ukraine

ICOM has launched the Emergency Red List of Cultural Objects at Risk – Ukraine in an effort to help protect endangered cultural heritage of Ukraine for future generations in light of the recent invasion by Russian forces.
Viking silver treasure uncovered in Täby in Stockholm

Viking silver treasure uncovered in Täby in Stockholm

A 1000-year-old silver hoard containing several beautiful torque-style neck rings, arm rings and coins has been discovered in Viggbyholm, Täby, outside Stockholm.
Fossil of giant ancient marine turtle found in Spain

Fossil of giant ancient marine turtle found in Spain

3.74 meters long, it is the largest sea turtle ever found in Europe and one of the largest ever to have lived on Earth.
Archaeologists find 1,800-year-old Roman winepress

Archaeologists find 1,800-year-old Roman winepress

The well-preserved remains of an ancient winepress have been found near the Roman fort Apsaros (today's Gonio near Batumi, Georgia).
Roman coin reveals long-lost Roman Emperor

Roman coin reveals long-lost Roman Emperor

New research on ancient gold coins from The Hunterian collection at the University of Glasgow and the Brukenthal National Museum in Sibiu, Romania, has revealed a long-lost Roman Emperor named Sponsian.
Let them eat stew: Research sheds new light on foodways in the first cities

Let them eat stew: Research sheds new light on foodways in the first cities

The world’s first urban state societies developed in Mesopotamia, modern-day Iraq, some 5500 years ago. No other artefact type is more symbolic of this development than the so-called Beveled Rim Bowl.
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