AGENDA June 2024

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Did Easter Islanders Commit ‘Ecocide’?

Did Easter Islanders Commit ‘Ecocide’?

A new study challenges this narrative of ecocide, saying that Rapa Nui’s population never spiraled to unsustainable levels.
Urgent call to preserve an ancient Syrian temple

Urgent call to preserve an ancient Syrian temple

In a new paper from the Bulletin of ASOR, the authors argue for the urgent need to intervene in the restoration of the temple.
The world’s oldest wine discovered

The world’s oldest wine discovered

A white wine over 2,000 years old, of Andalusian origin, is the oldest wine ever discovered.
Yannis Hamilakis: Archaeology In Two Buffer States

Yannis Hamilakis: Archaeology In Two Buffer States

National identity issues and their development through archaeology, as discussed in a lecture by Yannis Hamilakis and Dimitris Plantzos in Athens.
The world’s oldest shipwreck discovered in the deep sea

The world’s oldest shipwreck discovered in the deep sea

Ship’s cargo containing hundreds of intact jars, was discovered at a distance of about 90 km from the northern coast of Israel.
Victims of a tsunami or human sacrifice?

Victims of a tsunami or human sacrifice?

Archaeologists have been investigating human bones found near the ruins of a bridge in the Three Lakes region of Switzerland.
Using archaeology for recovery from trauma

Using archaeology for recovery from trauma

Seminar on the results of using archaeology to help those suffering from trauma (especially members of the Military of Defence).
Wreck of Quest found in Labrador Sea

Wreck of Quest found in Labrador Sea

An expedition led by the Royal Canadian Geographical Society found the vessel intact and upright at a depth of 390 metres.
New thoughts on Seahenge

New thoughts on Seahenge

New research suggests 'Seahenge' was created in response to a period of extreme climatic deterioration at the close of the third millennium BC.
Dairy consumption in the Pyrenees in the Early Neolithic

Dairy consumption in the Pyrenees in the Early Neolithic

First direct proof of the consumption and processing of dairy products in the Pyrenees already at the start of the Neolithic period.
European ceratops was not a ceratops at all

European ceratops was not a ceratops at all

Scientists showed that the fossils attributed to a ceratopsian belonged to a completely different group of dinosaurs.
The Middle Kingdom of Ancient Egypt

The Middle Kingdom of Ancient Egypt

This book examines the evidence for the culture, history and society of both central and provincial Egypt at the time, revealing the wealth of the entire country.
Living and dying in Egypt. From Alexander the Great to Cleopatra

Living and dying in Egypt. From Alexander the Great to Cleopatra

From 27 June to 3 November 2024, discover the new temporary exhibition at the Musée d'Aquitaine in Bordeaux.
Origin and spread of malaria

Origin and spread of malaria

Scientists reconstruct ancient genomes of the two most deadly malaria parasites, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum.
6,000 years ago, men and women had equal access to resources

6,000 years ago, men and women had equal access to resources

All the people in Barmaz necropolises (Switzerland) during the Neolithic period had the same access to food resources.
Ritual sacrifice at Chichén Itzá

Ritual sacrifice at Chichén Itzá

Ancient Maya genomes reveal the practice of male twin sacrifice and the enduring genetic legacy of colonial-era epidemics.
Poor Things. The Costumes

Poor Things. The Costumes

In summer 2024, the Benaki Museum in collaboration with Searchlights Pictures brings to Athens the exhibition ‘Poor Things. The Costumes.’
Vrysaki: The Revival of a Neighborhood

Vrysaki: The Revival of a Neighborhood

The opening of the exhibition: “Vrysaki: The Revival of a Neighborhood” is on Tuesday, June 18, 2024, at 7:00pm.
A unique find for Minoan archaeology

A unique find for Minoan archaeology

The ongoing excavations on the summit of Papoura Hill, Crete, have yielded a monumental architectural complex of circular shape.
Euripides’ Phoenician Women Online Conference

Euripides’ Phoenician Women Online Conference

Fully online conference on Euripides’ Phoenician Women, prompted by the summer 2024 production of the Cyprus Theatre Organisation.
Archaeologists set out to uncover ‘lost house’ in Durham

Archaeologists set out to uncover ‘lost house’ in Durham

Durham University archaeologists are part of a 100-strong team aiming to uncover the mysteries of a ‘lost’ house at Auckland Castle.
Archaeologists uncover new evidence for prehistoric comet

Archaeologists uncover new evidence for prehistoric comet

In Greenland, researchers found elevated levels of chemicals indicating a large, prehistoric fire raged at the beginning of the Younger Dryas climate event.
Archaeologists find letters from Roman centurions

Archaeologists find letters from Roman centurions

Polish archaeologists investigating an ancient port have found papyri containing letters from Roman centurions stationed in Egypt.
An ancient necropolis of children and stillborns in Auxerre

An ancient necropolis of children and stillborns in Auxerre

INRAP archaeologists have excavated a necropolis for young children and stillborns in the historic centre of Auxerre.
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