Stéphanie Anthonioz, Alice Mouton, Daniel Petit (eds.), When
Gods Speak to Men. Divine Speech according to Textual Sources
in the Ancient Mediterranean Basin, Fribourg, Switzerland /
Göttingen, Germany, 2019. – X, 138 pp. – pdf-file (1.6 MB)

The nature of divine speech in Antiquity in the Mediterranean Basin has often been the object of scholarly analysis, especially regarding its divinatory context and questions of genre and rhetoric. The present volume not only provokes a dialogue with this past research, but seeks to respond to a problem that has received little consideration until now: the articulation of divine speech with the various forms of its representation (linguistic, literary, and material). The aim is to analyze the nature of divine speech through its materiality and the impact of the latter on the former’s definition and evolution.

“(…) The aim is to analyze the nature of divine speech through
its materiality and the impact of the latter on the former’s
definition and evolution.”

Includes one egyptological article:
Dominique Lefèvre, “When Egyptian Gods Speak: Divine Discourse
in Context”, pp. 9-20: “This contribution offers a reflection about the nature of divine speech in Ancient Egyptian sources. From these, there seems to
be no perceptible difference between the language of men and that
of gods, neither in lexicon nor in syntax. However, this situation
is perhaps misleading. Indeed, Egyptians could use many
communication methods, thus highlighting a differentiation between
the language of men and that of gods. Therefore, different types
of texts are analyzed in order to bring to light these strategies
of communication: funerary and theological compositions,
mythological tales, medico-magical writings, texts of royal
ideology, ritual scenes and, of course, oracular consultations.”