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News: Museums
Museum of Modern Art , New York (photo: Wikipedia)
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by Archaeology Newsroom

Free online courses from the MoMA

Art, photography and fashion

During the period of social distancing owing to the coronavirus pandemic, the Museum of Modern Art, New York (MoMA) is offering free online courses adapted for a wider public.

Art, photography and fashion are the three areas covered by the courses which will include audio interviews with artists, designers and curators as well as analyses and exercises.

Participants are invited to explore the following topics: “Fashion as design”, “Seeing through photography”, ”In the studio: postwar abstract painting”, “Modern art and ideas” and “What is contemporary art?”

“Fashion as design” focuses on a selection of over 70 garments and accessories from across the world ranging from African kente to jeans and dresses with 3D designs.

The course “In the studio: postwar abstract painting” offers an in depth look at materials, techniques and thoughts of seven artists of the New York School: Willem de Kooning, Yayoi Kusama, Agnes Martin, Barnett Newman, Jackson Pollock, Ad Reinhardt  and Mark Rothko.

The “Modern art and ideas” course has been designed for those interested in learning more about modern and contemporary art with specific topics such as Places and Spaces, Art and Identity, Transforming Everyday Objects and Art and Society.

In “What is contemporary art?”, architects, artists and designers from across the world will talk about the creative process, materials and the sources of their inspiration and present over 70 works from the 1980s to the present.

“Seeing through photography” attempts to bridge the gap between viewing and really understanding photographs by introducing different ideas, approaches and technologies. The course will examine the ways photography has been used during its almost 180 years old history as a means of artistic expression, a tool for science and research, as document, narrative and the recording of stories, as a way of communication and critique of visual culture.

See more here.