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Research - Education: Metallography
Casting and working of metals and aspects of bronze casting in the ancient world is one of the subjects of the course.
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by Archaeology Newsroom

Technology, Microstructure, and Corrosion of Ancient Metals

Summer Intensive Course at the University College of London

Summer Intensive Course on Ancient Metals and Metallography, University College London, July 22-26th, 2013

The course on “Ancient and Historic Metals: Technology, Microstructure, and Corrosion” will be held at University College London, Department of Mechanical Engineering, (Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE, UK) from 22nd to 26th July 2013.

Instructor: Dr. David A. Scott, Professor, Department of Art History, Founding Director, UCLA/Getty Programme in Archaeological and Ethnographic Conservation.

Course Aims

This five-day course will act both as an introduction and a focus of more intensive study dealing with the examination, analysis, metallographic examination and corrosion of ancient and historic metals.

The course is designed to benefit conservators, scientists and archaeologists who wish to learn how to prepare metallic samples for metallographic study, learn something of the technological aspects of the working and structure of metals, and how corrosion and patination can be discussed and examined with the aid of polished cross-sections.

Artefacts for examination

Over the past 30 years an unrivalled collection of mounted metallographic samples has been assembled, which are studied as part of the course practical work, involving both polarized light microscopy and metallographic microscopy of freshly polished and etched samples. These samples range from cast iron from China to wootz steel from India, bronze coinage alloys from the Roman Empire to high-tin bronze from ancient Thailand, silver alloys from the Parthian period to ancient Ecuador, gilded copper and tumbaga from Peru and Colombia, to mention only a few of the geographical areas covered by available samples. Course participants will be instructed in the use of polishing and etching in the examination of samples and are encouraged to keep digital images which can be downloaded directly to their own computer, of the samples they have prepared during the week.

Students may also bring their own samples for examination if mounted and ground, or if not mounted, then one or two samples may be brought which can be mounted and prepared during the course.

For registrations and further information on this course: dascott@ucla.edu.

Course Schedule

The course will be held over the five days, Monday-Friday, July 22nd-July 26th , 2013. The course will take place at UCL Department of Mechanical Engineering, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE. Many nearby hotels and hostels can be found in this area. The course will run from 9:15am-5pm each day.

The course is open to a maximum of 10 participants only.

Course Costs

The cost of the instruction for the five days will be $900.00 or sterling equivalent of this amount (550 Pounds Sterling). For details of payment and to register for this course, interested participants should contact the course organizer and director: Professor David A. Scott, Room A410, The Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, UCLA, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles CA, 90095-1510, USA dascott@ucla.edu.

 

 

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